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Do Height Growth Vitamins Really Work? – Vigorous Herbs

Several vitamins and minerals are essential for the growth and development of children. The best way to ensure that they are meeting their nutritional needs is to provide them with a varied and balanced diet because there is no complete food that guarantees health on its own. Here are the roles of some of the essential nutrients and where to find them.

Do Height Growth Vitamins Really Work - Vigorous Herbs

Do Height Growth Vitamins Really Work – Vigorous Herbs

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Vitamin A

Vitamin A helps the growth of bones and tissues covering various parts of the body (cornea, bronchi, intestine, skin, etc.). It allows you to see well at night and contributes to the proper functioning of the immune system.

Vitamin A is present in foods of animal and plant origin. In plants, it is in the form of carotenoids, which the body transforms into vitamin A.

Some form of vitamin A is found in the following foods:
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Liver (chicken, beef, etc.) and fish liver oil

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Orange fruits and vegetables (e.g. cantaloupe, mango, sweet potato, carrot, pumpkin, and other squash)

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Leafy green vegetables (e.g. lettuce, spinach, kale )

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Eggs

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Fish and seafood

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Dairy products (milk, yogurt, cheese)

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Vitamin C

Vitamin C increases the absorption of iron from grain products, legumes, eggs, and vegetables. It helps the immune system to function properly, heals wounds, and builds and regenerates blood, skin, bones, and ligaments. As vitamin C has antioxidant properties, it also helps protect body cells.

Vitamin C is found in the following foods:
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Lawyer

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Cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kale

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Strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, and blackberries

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Kiwi

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Mango

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Melons

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Orange, grapefruit, clementine, tangerine

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Papaya

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Sweet potatoes and potatoes with the peel

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Snow peas

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Green, yellow, orange, and red peppers

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How to preserve vitamin C?

Vitamin C is very sensitive. Indeed, light, heat, and air can destroy it. Here are some tips to keep it as much as possible in fruits and vegetables:

Cut back on fruits and vegetables when you need them, rather than stocking up for a few days. If you want to save time and cut some ahead of time, do so only the day before or the day before, and place them in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Wash fruits and vegetables under running water, not by soaking them.

Keep fruits in the refrigerator, as they retain vitamin C between 5 and 10 times better than at room temperature.

Favor fast cooking methods without contact with water (or very little), such as steaming, sautéing, in the oven, in foil, stewed.

Eat raw fruits and vegetables regularly and, if cooked, keep them crunchy.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D contributes to healthy bones and teeth by facilitating the absorption of calcium and by normalizing blood levels of calcium and phosphorus. It also contributes to several functions in the body such as strengthening the immune system. Studies have also found that it helps protect against severe asthma attacks, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and certain cancers.

Vitamin D is found in the following foods:
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Fortified soy beverages

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Milk

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Margarine

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Eggs

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Fatty fish and fish oils

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Fortified yogurt (check the list of ingredients)

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Other sources of vitamin D

Thanks to the sun, the body produces its own vitamin D. A 10 to 15-minute sun exposure allows a child to produce enough vitamin D to meet his daily needs. However, applying sunscreen prevents the production of vitamin D by the skin.

Since most people don’t apply enough sunscreen to block 100% of UVB rays, partial sun exposure helps meet a child’s vitamin D needs, especially in the summer. This production of vitamin D is on the other hand impossible from October to April in Canada, because the sunshine and the power of the solar rays are then insufficient.

Vitamin D supplements

It is difficult to achieve recommended intakes of vitamin D through diet alone. To achieve this, one would need to drink 1.5 liters of milk per day, which is unrealistic and excessive.

For this reason, more and more pediatricians and nutritionists recommend that children take a supplement of 400 IU during the fall and winter, in addition to regularly eating foods that contain vitamin D. Breastfed babies should. also receive a supplement of 400 IU of vitamin D per day, because breast milk does not contain enough.

For more information, see our Vitamin D sheet.

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 contributes to the formation of blood cells and the proper functioning of nerves. Naturally, it is found in foods of animal origin only. Some foods of plant origin are however fortified.

Since vegetarian or vegan children are at risk of lacking vitamin B12, it is strongly recommended that they meet with a nutritionist. She can check if they are getting enough vitamin B12 or if they should be taking a supplement.

Vitamin B12 is found in the following foods:
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Fortified soy beverages

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Baking powder

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Eggs

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Dairy products (milk, yogurt, cheese)

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Fish

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Meat (beef, chicken, pork, turkey, etc.)

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Calcium

Calcium helps build and maintain strong bones and teeth. Calcium is essential for children because their bones are in a period of growth and development. Calcium is also essential for muscle contractions, including those of the heart. In addition, it helps to regulate blood pressure, promotes healing and it allows the brain to send messages to other parts of the body.

Calcium is found in the following foods:
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Algae

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Almonds, sesame seeds, and tahini (sesame butter)

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Fortified soy beverages

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Green vegetables (broccoli, cabbage, cavalier cabbage, bok choy, kale )

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Legumes (white beans, pinto, red beans, etc.)

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Tofu prepared with calcium (see list of ingredients)

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Canned fish (salmon, sardines) with bones

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Whole wheat bread

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Dairy products (milk, yogurt, cheese)

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Iron

Iron carries oxygen to tissue and muscle cells. It also facilitates the cognitive development of children by increasing their degree of attention and concentration and improving their intellectual performance.

Iron comes in two forms: heme and non-heme. Heme iron found in meat, poultry, and fish is more easily absorbed than non-heme iron supplied by eggs and vegetables. When there is no meat or fish at the meal, you can include food containing vitamin C, as this increases the absorption of non-heme iron.

 

 

Iron is found in the following foods:
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Eggs

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Dark green vegetables (spinach, broccoli, peas, green beans, cabbage, etc.)

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Legumes (lentils, peas, beans, etc.)

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Nuts and seeds

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Extra-firm tofu (more than soft, medium, or firm tofu)

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Fish and seafood

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Grain products fortified with iron

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Meats

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Poultry

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To find out more, see our sheet Iron in children.

Magnesium

Magnesium helps in the strengthening of bones and teeth. It also helps the muscles and the heart do their jobs well, as well as helping to control blood pressure, produce protein and use energy from food.

Magnesium is found in the following foods:
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Green vegetables (spinach, Swiss chard, artichoke)

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Legumes (edamame, black-eyed bean, white bean, black bean, etc.)

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Nuts and seeds (Brazil nuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, etc.)

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Whole-grain cereal products

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Phosphorus

Phosphorus plays a role in the formation of bones and teeth. It also helps produce and store the energy the body needs, and a host of other chemical reactions inside all cells.

Phosphorus is found in the following foods:
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Fortified soy beverages

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Eggs

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Legumes (lentils, peas, beans, etc.)

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Nuts and seeds

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Pisces

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Dairy products (milk, yogurt, cheese)

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Tempeh

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Tofu

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Meats

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Poultry

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Zinc

Zinc supports the development and growth of toddlers. It strengthens the immune system and thus helps fight infections. Zinc also helps in healing wounds.

Zinc from meat, poultry, and seafood is better absorbed than from grains, legumes, or vegetables.

Zinc is found in the following foods:
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Seafood

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Legumes (lentils, peas, beans, etc.)

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Nuts

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Whole-grain cereal products

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Dairy products (milk, yogurt, cheese)

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Red meats

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Poultry

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Other vitamins and minerals

Food provides several other essential vitamins and minerals like potassium, selenium, folate, etc. These nutrients are found in different foods. This is why a varied diet is so important.

Here’s what you can do to make sure your child doesn’t go missing:

Offer him foods of various colors every day, as they indicate the presence of different minerals and vitamins;

Do not remove the peel from fruits and vegetables when they are edible, as they contain many vitamins and minerals. However, make sure to wash it well;

Choose whole-grain cereal products;

Vary the sources of protein (meat, poultry, fish, legumes, tofu, etc.).

Should children be given multivitamins?

A vitamin and mineral supplement will never replace food.

If your child has a varied diet and eats vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and protein foods, their vitamin and mineral needs should be met. For most children, taking a daily multivitamin is not necessary. Some children may be at risk of deficiencies, and taking a multivitamin may then be strongly advised.

This is the case for children who:

suffer from chronic illnesses or serious eating disorders;

have a growth problem;

eat very little;

have a vegetarian or vegan diet;

have several food allergies, thus depriving them of many foods and nutrients on a daily basis;

do not have a balanced diet.

If you think your child might need a vitamin and mineral supplement, talk to their doctor or nutritionist to make sure they really need them. It is important not to overemphasize multivitamins if your child is taking them, as this may lead them to believe that they are essential for good health.

To remember

The best way to ensure that your child’s nutritional needs are met is to provide a variety of foods.

Having colorful plates throughout your meals is a good way to ensure a variety of vitamins and minerals.

Consulting a nutritionist is recommended if the child is vegetarian, vegan, capricious, has stunted growth, or multiple allergies.

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