Vigorous Herbs

Herbal Medicine – Vigorous Herbs

Indicated for minor ailments, herbal medicine has its origins in the dawn of time, when a man found something to cure himself in nature. Today, even if very few phytotherapist doctors consult, it is better to go to a specialist than to resort to self-medication.

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Herbal Medicine - Vigorous Herbs

Herbal Medicine – Vigorous Herbs

• The first medicines

Herbal medicine is the oldest form of medicine. It is now practiced in many parts of the world.

In developed countries, the pharmaceutical industry has never stopped studying plants and their active ingredients in order to develop new drugs.

The chemical composition of many of them is also modeled on that of the plants they replace or improve (40% of allopathic medicines contain ingredients that come from plants).

 

  • What to treat with plants?

Plants can be used to treat minor ailments: digestive disorders, sleep disorders, skin conditions, mild joint problems.

But it is always advisable to contact professionals. Although herbal remedies are generally safe and have fewer side effects than allopathic remedies, one should consult a professional before undergoing herbal treatment along with allopathic treatment.

Be careful, some plants can be fatal! Herbalists and pharmacists are the best advisers when it comes to the medicinal use of plants.

 

  • What happens during a session?

During the first consultation (it can last an hour), the phytotherapist seeks to establish a complete assessment of the patient by questioning him about his current disorder, his history, his lifestyle, etc.

The effects of phytotherapy are gradual: medicinal plants, much less concentrated, have a much slower action than chemical drugs. In return, they can be used over much longer periods.

 

  • Plants, in many forms

Depending on the part of the plant that is used, different techniques are preferred:

– the infusion (for the most fragile parts of the plant) consists of letting a certain quantity of plant infuse between 10 and 15 minutes, before filtering and consuming.

– decoction: used when using the hard – woody – parts of the plant (root, bark, etc.), it consists of letting them boil for 10 to 20 minutes, before filtering and consuming.

– maceration: this process consists of leaving the mixture, cold or hot, for a dozen hours before consuming it.

Plants can also be used in powders (preparations made with crushed, pulverized, and sieved plant parts), in extracts, in suspensions, in tinctures, in syrups, in essential oils.

Some plants have a bad taste or are very bitter, they can be sweetened by using certain plants or honey (sugar is likely to ferment).

The new science of herbal medicine is shaking up medicine

Chemistry, new technologies, and advances in genetics are now reviving the hope of unraveling the secret of the therapeutic effects of plants, revealing a more complex world than previously thought. To the point of questioning some of our old pharmacological paradigms. Here are the promises of herbal medicine.

Esoteric experiences, new age practices … Faced with progress in chemistry and in the age of all-powerful synthetic molecules, healing through plants had become the prerogative of a few isolated originals. This ancestral approach, on which medicine relied in its early days, had ended up falling into disuse when it was not ridiculed. Has the hour of revenge come? The natural pharmacopeia, renamed ” phytotherapy “, has come back to the fore for several years, adorned with new… scientific attractions.

Phytotherapy today calls in fact new technologies, chemistry, genetics … to try to dissect, support, demonstrate or,   conversely, invalidate the powers of plants. Thanks to high-throughput screening, this new science is now capable of testing thousands of molecules per day in vitro, which it draws from gigantic “chimithèques” formed over time. Perhaps identifying new plants with medicinal properties tomorrow. Chemistry, with new extraction methods and new solvents – supercritical CO2, hexane, water bombarded with ultrasound – makes it possible to improve and perhaps increase their efficiency in the future. AN ARSENAL OF DEFENSIVE MOLECULES

And that’s not all, “the changes induced by a complex plant extract can now be observed at the level of the proteome and the metabolome, that is to say at the level of proteins and metabolic intermediates of a cell set. ‘An organ or an organism, ‘enthuses Jacques Fleurentin, pharmacist and president of the French Society of Ethnopharmacology. Not to mention that   “genetics and the knowledge acquired on the microbiota could soon make it possible to better understand why the same plant has different effects from one individual to another “, adds Loïc Bureau, associate professor at the Faculty of Pharmacy at Rennes 1 University. So many hopes to answer THE central question posed by phytotherapy: how to explain its functioning, the subtleties of which continue to elude us?

What we understand quite well, for now, is why plants contain substances capable of healing us, humans. Why St. John’s Wort Kills Symptoms of Depression; why valerian is able to put us to sleep; and why the willow lowers the fever … And it is above all on the side of chemistry that we must look for the answer. Because it is, at the origin, a simple story of chemical warfare.

Immobile, unable to flee the numerous attacks they undergo, the plants could only retaliate by developing an arsenal of defensive molecules. Through the play of natural selection, those capable of synthesizing substances with a bitter taste, an unpleasant odor, or with deleterious, even fatal effects on the organism of their attackers, have given themselves the best chances of survival, of being able to reproduce and transmit to their descendants these weapons of mass protection. Chemical defenses invented by nature, which humans then diverted for their own use.

With an astonishing paradox: it is often the most poisonous plants that have been used to heal us. Deadly poisons for humans, belladonna, colchicum, or digitalis have thus given rise, respectively, to atropine, used in emergency situations to treat bradycardia, to colchicine, the standard treatment for gout, and with digoxin, powerful cardiotonic.

The new science of herbal medicine is shaking up medicine

Chemistry, new technologies, and advances in genetics are now reviving the hope of unraveling the secret of the therapeutic effects of plants, revealing a more complex world than previously thought. To the point of questioning some of our old pharmacological paradigms. Here are the promises of herbal medicine.

Esoteric experiences, new age practices. Faced with progress in chemistry and in the age of all-powerful synthetic molecules, healing through plants had become the prerogative of a few isolated originals. This ancestral approach, on which medicine relied in its early days, had ended up falling into disuse when it was not ridiculed. Has the hour of revenge come? The natural pharmacopeia, renamed ” phytotherapy “, has come back to the fore for several years, adorned with new… scientific attractions.

Phytotherapy today calls in fact new technologies, chemistry, genetics … to try to dissect, support, demonstrate or, conversely, invalidate the powers of plants. Thanks to high-throughput screening, this new science is now capable of testing thousands of molecules per day in vitro, which it draws from gigantic “chimithèques” formed over time. Perhaps identifying new plants with medicinal properties tomorrow. Chemistry, with new extraction methods and new solvents – supercritical CO2, hexane, water bombarded with ultrasound – makes it possible to improve and perhaps increase their efficiency in the future. AN ARSENAL OF DEFENSIVE MOLECULES

What’s more, that is not every one of, “the progressions incited by an unpredictable plant concentrate would now be able to be seen at the level of the proteome and the metabolome, in other words at the level of proteins and metabolic intermediates of a cell set. ‘An organ or an organism, ‘enthuses Jacques Fleurentin, pharmacist and president of the French Society of Ethnopharmacology. Not to mention that “genetics and the knowledge acquired on the microbiota could soon make it possible to better understand why the same plant has different effects from one individual to another “, adds Loïc Bureau, associate professor at the Faculty of Pharmacy at Rennes 1 University. So many hopes to answer THE central question posed by phytotherapy: how to explain its functioning, the subtleties of which continue to elude us?

What we understand quite well, for now, is why plants contain substances capable of healing us, humans. Why St. John’s Wort Kills Symptoms of Depression; why valerian is able to put us to sleep; and why the willow lowers the fever … And it is above all on the side of chemistry that we must look for the answer. Because it is, at the origin, a simple story of chemical warfare.

Immobile, unable to flee the numerous attacks they undergo, the plants could only retaliate by developing an arsenal of defensive molecules. Through the play of natural selection, those capable of synthesizing substances with a bitter taste, an unpleasant odor, or with deleterious, even fatal effects on the organism of their attackers, have given themselves the best chances of survival, of being able to reproduce and transmit to their descendants these weapons of mass protection. Chemical defenses invented by nature, which humans then diverted for their own use.

With an astonishing paradox: it is often the most poisonous plant that has been used to heal us. Deadly poisons for humans, belladonna, colchicum, or digitalis have thus given rise, respectively, to atropine, used in emergency situations to treat bradycardia, to colchicine, the standard treatment for gout, and with digoxin, powerful cardiotonic.

 

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